Leaked TPP Text – Five questions and answers
Here’s the response of George Washington University professor Susan Sell to five questions about the intellectual property chapter of the proposed Trans-Pacific Partnership agreement, which the Obama administration has been negotiating with trading partners behind closed doors. A draft of the chapter was leaked to WikiLeaks two days ago."From this text it appears that the U.S. administration is negotiating for intellectual property provisions that it knows it could not achieve through an open democratic process. For example, it includes provisions similar to those of the failed Stop Online Piracy Act (SOPA), and Protect Intellectual Property Act (PIPA), and the Anti-Counterfeiting Trade Agreement (ACTA) that the European Parliament ultimately rejected.(…) Other U.S. proposals would create exclusive new rights over clinical trial data, so that generic firms would be prohibited from using those results to prove efficacy and bioequivalence. The United States also proposes patents for medical procedures. Overall, these provisions would reduce generic competition, reduce access to medicines, and raise drug prices. This seems ironic in light of Obama’s professed domestic commitment to affordable health care.”Read the full article here.

Leaked TPP Text – Five questions and answers

Here’s the response of George Washington University professor Susan Sell to five questions about the intellectual property chapter of the proposed Trans-Pacific Partnership agreement, which the Obama administration has been negotiating with trading partners behind closed doors. A draft of the chapter was leaked to WikiLeaks two days ago.

"From this text it appears that the U.S. administration is negotiating for intellectual property provisions that it knows it could not achieve through an open democratic process. For example, it includes provisions similar to those of the failed Stop Online Piracy Act (SOPA), and Protect Intellectual Property Act (PIPA), and the Anti-Counterfeiting Trade Agreement (ACTA) that the European Parliament ultimately rejected.
(…)
Other U.S. proposals would create exclusive new rights over clinical trial data, so that generic firms would be prohibited from using those results to prove efficacy and bioequivalence. The United States also proposes patents for medical procedures. Overall, these provisions would reduce generic competition, reduce access to medicines, and raise drug prices. This seems ironic in light of Obama’s professed domestic commitment to affordable health care.”

Read the full article here.

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